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Apple Unveils New iPods

posted Mar 25, 2011, 10:59 PM by Golden Knight
By Chris Keppel

9/12/10

Photo Credit: Apple

Last Tuesday, Apple unveiled a new line up, or generation, of iPods. In addition to revamping the look of their most sleek products, they changed the hardware in every series of the device.

                The design of the iPod shuffle returned to its previously thin and box-like form. Last year’s shuffle took the largest design deviation from its predecessor, resembling a piece of Trident gum.

                The iPod Nano may be the most impressive design debuted this week. It no longer sports Apple’s signature click wheel, a feature that used to be an essential part of any iPod only a few years ago. Like its better selling sibling, it now features a touch screen and an operating system relatively similar to that of the iPod Touch and the iPhone. In addition, the new Nano is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, a significant size change from its already tiny predecessor.

                Many fans of the company have been waiting for two years for Apple to release its latest version of the iPod touch. The new release has been given a higher resolution touch screen and a faster processor, meaning that games and applications will run a little more fluidly. Last year, rumors circulated that a camera would be placed on the newest version of the iPod Touch resulting from a large shipment of cameras Apple was importing from China. Fans were disappointed, however, when Apple unveiled that the cameras were to be used in the older edition of the iPod Nano. Many will be happy to discover that the new iPod Touch has been given a camera similar to that of the iPhone 4.

                The new iPod is closer to the capabilities of the iPhone than its predecessors making the idea of an iPhone without the monthly phone bill enticing to fans. The new iPod is a significant improvement from a relatively disappointing generation of Apple products and a needed step with the onslaught of production from the competing Android market.

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